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The Newark Experience: Puerto Ricans & Latinos

Newspapers

La Tribuna de New Jersey
The Newark Public Library has digitized their issues of the newspaper. 1975-2011 (Incomplete).
The Newark News clippings file has about 85 articles on Puerto Ricans in Newark going back to 1954.
The Newark Public Library has microfilmed the Newark News files; Dana Library has microfilm for a portion of the collection. The articles on Puerto Ricans are on Reel N-45, in the Dana Newark Collection.

Hispanic Research and Information Center

New Jersey Hispanic Research and Information Center.
Research Center at the Newark Public Library. Includes the Latino Oral History Collections as well as the Puerto Rican Community Archives, a collection of primary resources on the history and culture of New Jersey's Puerto Rican community.

Latinos in Newark

Puerto Ricans

The Puerto Rican in New Jersey; His Present Status, July, 1955.
New Jersey. Division on Civil Rights. Newark, 1955. Available?
Venceremos! Harambee!: A Black & Puerto Rican Union?
Lauren O'Brien. New Jersey Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 4(1), 2018, pp. 130-146.
"In November of 1969, 2,700 members of Newark’s African American and Puerto Rican community assembled at the Black and Puerto Rican Political Convention to mobilize and strategize a plan to gain socio-political power...Newark’s communities of color resolved that the election of the city’s first Black mayor would provide a solution to many of their problems. Accordingly, the election of Kenneth Gibson validated the communities’ unified efforts and symbolized one of the most successful multiracial coalitions in Newark’s history...[However]...for many Puerto Ricans, Gibson’s victory was the impetus for a major rift between Puerto Ricans and African Americans."
The Puerto Ricans in Newark, N.J..
Hilda A. Hidalgo. Newark, Aspira, 1971. Available?
"Newark Seven Years Later: ¡Unidad Y Lucha!"
Imamu Amiri Baraka. Monthly Review 26(8), Jan. 1975, pp. 16-24.
Causes of the Puerto Rican Labor Day riot, September 2, 1974.
Newark's 1974 Puerto Rican Riots Through Oral Histories
Nicole Torres. New Jersey Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 4(2) 2018 pp. 212-229.
"This article includes contents of recorded oral histories from Sigfredo Carrion, William Sanchez, Gustav Heninburg, and Raul Davila recounting the events that took place in Branch Brook Park in 1974; events also known as the Puerto Rican Riots...The results of this uprising led to the creation of local organizations, such as La Casa de Don Pedro, and the construction of a more visible Puerto Rican identity with-in the city."
"Urban Erotics and Racial Affect in a Neoliberal 'Racial Democracy': Brazilian and Puerto Rican Youth in Newark, New Jersey,"
Ana Y. Ramos-Zayas. Identities 16(5), September 2009, pp.513-547. Rutgers-restricted Access
"Becoming American, Becoming Black? Urban Competency, Racialized Spaces, and the Politics of Citizenship among Brazilian and Puerto Rican Youth in Newark,"
Ana Y. Ramos-Zayas. Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power 14, 2007, 85-109.
"This essay examines the performance of 'race,' particularly the appropriation of 'Blackness,' among U.S.-born Latinos and Latin American migrants in two neighborhoods in Newark, New Jersey." Rutgers-restricted Access

Latin Caribbean

Immigrant Entrepreneurship, Institutional Logics, and Informality: A Study of Entrepreneurs and Urban Entrepreneurship Policy in Newark, New Jersey
Lutisha S. Vickerie. (Ph.D. Thesis) Rutgers University--Newark, 2018.
"This qualitative study profiles the way immigrant entrepreneurs from African and Caribbean countries navigate a different institutional environment than their home country."

Latinos

"Between a Roth and a Baraka: Researching and Writing the Latino History of Newark, New Jersey"
John Gutierrez. Three Historians: John Gutierrez, Mark Krasovic, and Julia Rabig. Newark History Society program, June 22, 2009.
Presencia Nueva: Knowledge for Service and Hope: A Study of Hispanics in the Archdiocese of Newark.
Newark, N.J., Archdiocese of Newark Office of Research and Planning, 1988. Available?
Cuban Social Circle of Newark
1970s? Photographs.
"The Effects of Centralized Government Authority on Black and Latino Political Empowerment"
Domingo Morel. Political Research Quarterly 69(2), June 2016, pp. 347-360.
"To assess the effects of centralized government on political empowerment among racial minorities, this article examines how state takeovers of local school districts have affected black and Latino descriptive representation on local school boards. Using an original dataset of state takeovers of local school districts from 1989 to 2013, as well as case study analysis of Newark, New Jersey, this article shows that centralization affects communities differently according to the level of political empowerment they have at the time of centralization." Rutgers-restricted Access
Recent Brazilian Immigrants to the United States: Human Service Needs and Help-seeking Behavior Rutgers-restricted access
David B. Sacks. Thesis (Psy.D.), Rutgers University, 1993. Available?
Um ministerio de consolo: projeto de capacitacao para atender a comunidade luso-brasileira em Newark, N.J./A Ministry of Comfort: An Equipping Project to Care for the Luso-Brazilian Community in Newark, NJ Rutgers-restricted access
Valdir Alves dos Reis. Thesis (D.Min.), Drew University, 2008. Available?
Stirring the Melting Pot: Food and the Performance of Inclusion in Newark's Ironbound Neighborhood Rutgers-restricted access
Lori Danielle Barcliff Baptista. Thesis (Ph.D.), Northwestern University, 2009. Available?
Salsa and Everyday Life: Music and Community Rutgers-restricted access
Robert Eric Siebert. Thesis (Ph.D.), State University of New York, 2010. Available?
Street Therapists: Race, Affect, and Neoliberal Personhood in Latino Newark.
Ana Y. Ramos-Zayas. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 2012. Available?
"Urban Erotics and Racial Affect in a Neoliberal 'Racial Democracy': Brazilian and Puerto Rican Youth in Newark, New Jersey,"
Ana Y. Ramos-Zayas. Identities 16(5), September 2009, pp.513-547. Rutgers-restricted Access
"Becoming American, Becoming Black? Urban Competency, Racialized Spaces, and the Politics of Citizenship among Brazilian and Puerto Rican Youth in Newark,"
Ana Y. Ramos-Zayas. Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power 14, 2007, 85-109.
"This essay examines the performance of 'race,' particularly the appropriation of 'Blackness,' among U.S.-born Latinos and Latin American migrants in two neighborhoods in Newark, New Jersey." Rutgers-restricted Access
The Global Financial Crisis and the Retrenchment of Multiculturalism and Economic Opportunities for Brazilian Immigrants in Newark, New Jersey
Simone Buechler. Latino Studies 12, 2014, pp. 596-619
"This article examines the relatively recent celebration of multiculturalism as a promising part of the neoliberal agenda in Newark and how during a time of economic crisis immigrants have become the scapegoats for a neoliberal model gone awry." Rutgers-restricted Access
Queering Political Economy in Neoliberal Ironbound Newark: Subjectivity and Spacemaking among Brazilian Queer Immigrant Men
Yamil Avivi. Dialogo 18(2), 2015, pp. 105-118.
"This ethnographic account employs textual and spatial-temporal analysis to generate an alternative narrative of gay/queer life and groupings in the Ironbound." Rutgers-restricted Access
Betina Botox and Lobixomen "Tao Engranados!" Queer Brazilian Televisual Representations Shaping Spatial (Im)possibilities in Newark
Yamil Avivi Garcia. Bilingual Review 33(4), January 2017, pp. 45-59.
"This ethnographic essay examines the ways two “tão engraçados” [very humorous] televisual Brazilian queer representations—those of Betina Botox (a questionably-middle-class gay male from Sāo Paulo) and Lobixomen (a heterosexual man who turns into a wolf in drag under a full moon)—impacted queer Brazilian informants who lived in the Ironbound..." Rutgers-restricted Access

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