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America in the 1960s and 1970s: Black Power

1968 Olympics: The Salute

U.S. Team Drops Smith and Carols for Clenched Fist Display on Victory Stand. From the New York Times

Race, Culture, and the Revolt of the Black Athlete: The 1968 Olympic Protests and Their Aftermath. Douglas Hartmann. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 2003. Available

Audio Files

Huey Newton Speaks. In this 1970 interview recorded in his prison cell, Newton, one of the founding members of the Black Panther Party, explains his views on many social and political issues of the time. Rutgers-restricted Access

Videos

All Power to The People!. Award-winning documentary looks at the rise and fall of the Black Panthers. Rutgers-restricted Resources

Still Revolutionaries. Documentary explores the lives of two women who were in the Black Panther Party between 1969 and 1975. Available?

Black Power

Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America.
Stokely Carmichael and Charles V. Hamilton. New York, Vintage Books, 1967. Available?
Black Protest in the Sixties.
Edited by August Meier, John Bracey, Jr., and Elliott Rudwick. New York, M. Wiener, 1991. Available?
New Day in Babylon: The Black Power Movement and American Culture, 1967-1975.
William L. Van Deburg. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1992. Available?
Remaking Black Power: How Black Women Transformed an Era.
Ashley D. Farmer. Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 2017. Available?

The Black Panther Party

Out of Oakland: Black Panther Party Internationalism During the Cold War
Sean L. Malloy. Ithaca, NY, Cornell University Press, 2017.
UC Berkeley Library Social Activism Sound Recording Project: The Black Panther Party
The intent of the project is to gather, catalog, and make accessible primary source media resources related to social activism and activist movements in California in the 1960's and 1970's. A Black Panther Chronology with links to audio files, as well as web sites, documents, and some video clips.
Black Panther Party: FBI Files
FBI’s Charlotte Field Office files on Black Panther Party activities from 1969 to 1976.
Digital Collections: Black Panthers
Digitized documents from the Michigan State University Libraries Gerlad M. Kline Digital and Multimedia Center.
Malcolm
"This is a comprehensive website on the life and legacy of Malcolm X."Chronology, audio files of speeches, photographs, bibliography, webliography, etc.
The Black Panther: Newspaper of the Black Panther Party
Twenty issues of the Black Panther Party newspaper from between 1968-1973. The full run of the newspaper is available in "Black Thought and Culture" below.

To find other relevant books and materials in QuickSearch search the subject terms:

Database: Black Thought and Culture

Black Thought and Culture
The full text of approximately 100,000 pages of non-fiction writing by leading figures in African American life and culture. Includes books, articles and essays, speeches, interviews, pamphlets and correspondence. Includes 135 items relating to the Black Panther Party, as well as the complete run of the Black Panther newspaper, 1966 through 1980. Rutgers-restricted Access

African-American Newspapers

Chicago Defender
The Chicago Defender was the most influential African-American newspaper of the 20th century. With the majority of its readership outside the Chicago region, it served as the de facto national black newspaper in the U.S. Search and display the full text of articles published between 1910 and 1975. Rutgers-restricted Access.
Ethnic NewsWatch
Full text collection of articles from newspapers, magazines and journals of the ethnic, minority and native press back to 1960. Rutgers-restricted Access.

Amiri Baraka and the Black Power Movement

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