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This guide focuses on resources you can use to find information on diversity and vulnerable populations in the context of social work practice.
Last Updated: Aug 14, 2013 URL: http://libguides.rutgers.edu/swdiversity Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

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Human Diversity

This guide focuses on resources you can use to find information on diversity and vulnerable populations in the context of social work practice.

 

Not Sure Where to Start?

Articles in scholarly encyclopedias usually present a good overview of the topic and identify the current issues, approaches, and scholarship relating to that topic. Knowing the issues can help you focus your research on a particular aspect of a topic.

 

Some Basic Reference Works

Encyclopedia of Social Work
20th edition. New York, National Association of Social Workers, 2008.
Almost always a good place to begin your research. About 400 lengthy signed articles with bibliographies on topics felt to be of particular relevance of social work, as well as 200 brief biographies of key figures in the history of social work. Many articles include a historical overview.
Off-Campus Access Rutgers-restricted Access
Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America
Jeffrey Lehman, editor. 2d edition. Detroit, Gale, 2000. 3 volumes
"Contains 8,000 to 12,000 word essays on specific culture groups in the United States, emphasizing religions, holidays, customs, and languages in addition to providing information on historical background and settlement patterns. Also covers ethnoreligious groups such as Jews, Chaldeans, and Amish. Each essay lists organizations and research centers; name, address, and contact information for periodicals, radio, and television stations; and a further readings section."
Off-Campus Access Rutgers-restricted Access
Platt, Anthony M. and Cooreman, Jenifer L. " A Multicultural Chronology of Welfare Policy and Social Work in the United States," Social Justice 28(1), Spring 2001, 91-137.
"This chronology is designed to introduce future social workers to significant events, policies, people, and publications in the history of welfare policy and social work in the United States...Issues of race and racism, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality are central to the chronology's perspective." Includes a extensive bibliography.
Off-Campus Link Rutgers-restricted Access

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