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Finding Scholarships: Home

Hints for finding mostly non-federal scholarships and fellowships.

Useful Links

Scholarship, Fellowship, and Funding Information Sources by Stephanie Bartz, Alexander Library

A Web-based guide to many kinds of funding sources.

 

Scholarships Page at Rutgers Newark Financial Aid

Some useful hints and sources for finding scholarships.

 

Rutgers Financial Aid TV

Information about all aspects of financial aid at Rutgers.  Includes videos about scholarships and private loans.

 

Finding and Applying for Scholarships (US Government site)

General information from the US Department of Education.

 

Foundation Directory Online  (Professional)  (Rutgers-restricted Access)

Full database from the Foundation Center.  An iPhone app version is available for Rutgers students and faculty.  If you are off campus, you will be prompted to sign in with your Net ID to access this material.

 

College Blue Book. 35th ed. 2008.  (Rutgers-restricted Access)

Online version of the College Blue Book.  Click on the Electronic Access link.  Choose Volume 5, which is devoted to scholarships.  Some Rutgers units have later print editions as well; consult the library catalog for updated information.  If you are off campus, you will be prompted to sign in with your Net ID to access this material.

 

Questions to Ask

Dear Student,

 

As the Federal Government continues to pull back from educational funding, you might look elsewhere for additional scholarship dollars.

 

Here are some questions to ask to help with your search:

 

1.  Where do you live?  Are there groups in your town that offer scholarships or other educational funding--fraternal organizations,  religious institutions, or  community associations?

2.  Where do you work?  Does your company offer any scholarships or tuition reimbursements?

3.  Where do your parents work?  Does their company offer scholarships for the children of employees?

4.  Could you get scholarship money by winning a competition or essay contest in your subject area (often sponsored by professional associations)?

5.  Does New Jersey offer any unique scholarship resources for its students?

6.  Could you get a special scholarship on the basis of ethnic affiliation or gender?

7.  What is your major?  Do any professional groups in your subject area offer scholarship money?  (You can also often join your professional associations as a student for very little money to begin networking right away.)

8.  Have you talked with your department chair?  How about an advisor or professor in your department?  They might know about funding sources specifically for your department or campus.

9.  Have you found websites that appear to offer scholarships but want you to pay for finding them?   These may be scams; discover other sources of information.

 

Hope these questions help a little.  If you think of more, please get back to me at the contact information in my profile to the right of this page.

 

 

 

 

Best regards,

 

Roberta Tipton

Subject Librarian

Roberta Tipton
Contact:
Roberta L. Tipton
Business Librarian
Public Administration Librarian
Information Literacy Coordinator
The John Cotton Dana Library
Rutgers-Newark
973-353-5910
tipton at rutgers.edu
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