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Art Library Research Guide: East Asian Art

Visit this research guide for books, articles, images, websites, and other resources for your art and art history classes.

What is it?

Includes art created by individuals who live or have heritage in China, Japan, Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam.

Electronic Resources

First check resources in the Find Articles tab of this LibGuide, and then return here for more specific materials.

Collections of Japanese Art Online and in Print: An extensive list of online and print resources for collections of Japanese art, with annotations. Some provide basic information on works, some include image files, while others go further, aiming to assist usefully in research and education. The most sophisticated of the sources list cross-references in the text entries, include bibliographic references, and provide links to definitions, encyclopedias, and order-forms for images.

JAANUS (Japanese Architecture and Art Net Users System): On-line dictionary of Japanese architectural and art historical terminology. Contains about 8000 terms related to traditional Japanese architecture and gardens, painting, sculpture and art-historical iconography from around the 1st century A.D. to the end of the Edo period (1868). Definitions are extensive and thorough. Compiled by Dr. Mary Neighbour Parent.

Scripta Sinica: (Hanji dianzi wenxian) is one of the largest Chinese full-text databases, with a special focus on the traditional Chinese classics. Contains almost all of the important Chinese classics, totaling more than 580 titles and over 423 million Chinese characters. Conduct full text searches or browse by book titles. Provided by the Institute of History and Philology (IHP), Academia Sinica (Taiwan), which will continue to add new titles and new features. Non-IHP resources provided by Academia Sinica also available on the old interface.

Tamakatzura Tamatori Attacked by the Octopus (1845-1846) by Utagawa Kuniyoshi

Credit

Some of the resources on this page were gathered from NYU's The Institute of Fine Arts guide by Michael Hughes.